The Most Overused Buzzwords and Marketing Speak in Press Releases

Adam Sherk

Home About Contact PR Publishing SEO Social Media Subscribe Adam Sherk The Most Overused Buzzwords and Marketing Speak in Press Releases by Adam Sherk on June 29, 2010 Unique, one-of-a-kind, best-of-breed…blah, blah, blah. I stopped reading press releases a long time ago.

Best Social PR Guides, Tips and Tools of 2010

Webbiquity SMM

How can you amplify and extend new releases through social media? The Most Overused Buzzwords and Marketing Speak in Press Releases by Adam Sherk. So, if you’re stumped for an opening line the next time you’re drafting a press release, try something like “XYZ Company, the leading innovator of unique, customer-centric solutions, today announced an outside the box product which supports peak performance.&# Is the Press Release Dead?

Trending Sources

Five Newsworthy Stories for Your Next Press Release

ProBlogger

This guest post is by Frank Strong of Vocus. Most bloggers understand that online press releases can drive traffic. Press releases are powerful ways to reach people through search. As Lee Odden wrote in his book Optimize , “search is an explicit expression of need or want” and online press releases provide the means to reach people at the precise time they are expressing that need. In other words, what are we going to write a press release about?

What the Playground Can Teach you about Social Media

Convince & Convert

Guest post by Stacey Acevero , social media community manager at Vocus and PRWeb. Remembering that the social world is really a combination of communities and groups who move in ever widening (and connecting) relationship circles, be sure your PR and social media efforts follow the rules that every smart small business marketer needs to know. Go beyond writing a press release , a blog or posting company content into social streams.

5 Tips for Forging a New Brand

Geoff Livingston

So I would align my offering with real or perceived market needs by listening and participate in social communities related to the brand topic. 3) Plan a surprise: Too many brand launches start with a simple blog post, press release or an email that says, “We’re open for business.”

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